NIKON AF-P DX NIKKOR 10-20MM – Test Shot Part 2

In our previous post, we wrote a brief introduction and review for the Nikon AF-P DX Nikkor 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6G VR lens. We also shared our initial shots taken with it in our Test Shot Part 1 post.

This is Test Shot Part 2 using the same lens. This time we focus on landscape photo in a very well lit situation. The shots are inclusive of building to show the biggest weakness of this lens, if you’re not familiar with Ultra Wide Angle lens. We will also show how to fix that with a very simple step. It will also give a hint or understanding on how to use this lens. If you plan to buy it, you should know that part. Also, please read our introduction and review post here before you buy it.

As we mentioned in our previous post, this lens doesn’t performed very well in low light condition. This is due to its small aperture range of f/4.5-5.6. If you plan to use it in low light condition, you need a good flash or lighting. If not, you might need to get higher end lens that comes with f/2.8 or bigger aperture range.

This lens is made for DX Nikon Camera. That means it will work best on DSLR with APS-C size sensor. But, this lens doesn’t work with all Nikon DSLRs. We listed out the cameras that you can and cannot use with this lens here. Please refer to it before you buy it or else you will be disappointed because there’s no way to make it work on unsupported camera. Not even manual focus work in those cameras.

We took this lens outdoor during a very sunny day this time. We want to highlight 5 things here, shots taken at every focal length, shot taken at various aperture value, horizontal versus vertical shot, more foreground versus more background and the main weakness of this lens, the distortion. As this is an Ultra Wide Angle lens, it behave differently from your normal general lens that normally start at 18mm. It become very visible at its widest focal length of 10mm.

  1. Shot taken at each and every focal length.
Shot at 10mm, f/8, ISO-100

Shot at 10mm, f/8, ISO-100

 

Shot at 10mm, f/8, ISO-100

Shot at 12mm, f/8, ISO-100

 

Shot at 14mm, f/8, ISO-100

Shot at 14mm, f/8, ISO-100

 

Shot at 16mm, f/8, ISO-100

Shot at 16mm, f/8, ISO-100

 

Shot at 20mm, f/8, ISO-100

Shot at 20mm, f/8, ISO-100

We kept the aperture and ISO at the same value for each shots to get the same detail as possible in each photo. It does not visible in those photos above but it will be a fair comparison.

The purpose of this is to give an overview of what you get from this lens in each of the focal length it offers. If you feel like you prefer the normal photos from over 18mm focal length more, then you might want to save your money to get a better general lens like the 17-55mm f/2.8 or Nikon 18-300mm f/3.5-6.3G ED VR AF-S. Or maybe just stick to your kit lens 18-140mm. This 10-20mm lens covers ultra wide angle to normal wide angle.

2. Shots taken at various aperture size of f/4.5, f/8, f/16 and f/22.

Shot at 10mm, f/4.5, ISO-100

Shot at 10mm, f/4.5, ISO-100

 

Shot at 10mm, f/8, ISO-100

Shot at 10mm, f/8, ISO-100



Shot at 10mm, f/16, ISO-100

Shot at 10mm, f/16, ISO-100

 

Shot at 10mm, f/22, ISO-100

Shot at 10mm, f/22, ISO-100

All shots were taken at 10mm with ISO-100 and focus was at the middle of the building using 9 AF points to try to get variations of some elements around the building. Of course you can use all of your camera’s AF points but the variations won’t be very distinct. At least not until you zoom in or process it in the post processing software.

In those shots, the most distinct difference is in the cloud. Smaller aperture will get the most details while wide aperture will get less. We are pretty sure you are familiar with aperture value and how it affect the photos you take. This won’t need any detailed explanation on that.

But, landscape photography is about small aperture. This is important to get as much details as possible in your shots. If your lighting condition permits, use the smallest aperture your camera or lens can, like f/22.

This lens works well when we take the shot at f/22 handheld. The photo is sharp and well exposed.

3. The distortion.

The thing about Ultra Wide Angle lens that irk a lot of photographer is the distortion of the subject. This is very visible if your shot include symmetrical object like building. As shown in the photo above, the building looks distorted at the bottom. While this photo looks good in terms of exposure, it doesn’t look that good as a whole. All because of that distortion. This is one behavior of this type of lens that you need to know how to “fix” when using it.

So how to fix it to make it less distorted?

Tilt your camera downwards to include more foreground but still maintain a good amount of background. Play around with the vertical angle to get the best shot. Like the shot below, does it look better than the one above?

It’s okay to include more foreground, sometimes, it make a better photo. If you need more background but don’t want your subject to be distorted, you need to get higher. Most of the time, that is not possible.

 

4. Horizontal vs vertical shot.

While this is more of a preference for the photographer, it does bring some differences into your composition. For landscape photography, it is better to shot horizontally, although, sometime shooting vertically can make a better photo. Vertical photo is best for a composition with only one tall subject in it. It will bring out the subject more into focus. Horizontal works best for shot with wide subject or shots that doesn’t have any specific subject or have many subjects in the frame.

For landscape photography, if you take horizontal shot of a single subject, it will be better if you get closer to it. While for vertical shot, you might want to get a bit further from the subject. Again, this all depend on many factors.

But generally, it still all up to your preference. Everybody have their own way of expressing things and no condition or situation is the same.

 

 

5. More foreground or background

This is mainly according to the photographer’s preference. Some want more foreground while some prefer more background. In one way or another, it does make your photos good or better, depending on the situation and what’s inside your frame.

More background

 

More foreground

Like we said, typically, it’s just a matter of preference. Although it can affect your photo especially if you are looking for that dramatic landscape photo or the one with an impact.

 

All of the photos above were taken straight out of the camera. No editing or post-processing done apart from adding the watermark.

Most of the landscape photos might look very “plain” out of the camera. Some post-processing need to be done to it, to make it into the way you want it to be. We played around with one of the images above and create the one below.

For more info on this lens go to http://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/camera-lenses/af-p-dx-nikkor-10-20mm-f%252f4.5-5.6g-vr.html

You can buy this lens here Nikon 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6G AF-P DX NIKKOR VR Lens (Nikon Malaysia)


You might be interested to read other related posts such as https://pansuh.com/nikon-10-20mm-vr/ and https://pansuh.com/nikon-10-20mm-test-photo-part-1/.


 

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